Norman Stone Keep

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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby Jotunn » Sat Aug 27, 2016 10:32 am

It might be that they didn't have a stream of members of the public who were strangers to the site to worry about. Presumably, the guards would be the more substantial free tenants doing their bit for their lord, so would have been likely to have served time as guards before on a regular basis.

In case my first guess is wildly wrong, is it possible that wickerwork could have been used? It is the kind of material that is easily removed or destroyed. Have a gut feeling that it may have been cheaper in comparison with some materials that would now be better value for money compared with wickerwork.

Feel free to mock my ignorance, as I am no expert.
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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby Bronshtein » Sat Aug 27, 2016 1:26 pm

So tempting! :D

But..

What we see remaining of most castles is misleading if judged on that alone.

For a start; many castles were either adapted to less violent times and altered to homes not defensive works, or they were simply abandoned because they were no longer needed and too expensive to keep running/adapt. So what is left is nothing like they would have been in the 12th to 15th centuries

You don't see all the wooden buildings, barriers, roofs and ad hoc structures. Go and have a look at a castle, and where there are good walls standing, look for all the post holes in walls. A lot of these will be scaffolding related from the building but there will also be floor joist holes for wooden structures, supports for wooden parapet covers, supports for wooden rail fences on higher levels. Some of the scaffolding post holes could be reused for these purposes.

Some loonies in France rebuilding a castle with old methods - including wooden scaffolding.
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The holes are known (anachronistically - 17th century) as putlocks. They were used for supports for hoardings and covered walkway construction as well.

So: yes you can have a lot of weather and general 'health and safety' features that you don't see today.

(I suspect the average Norman knight might not have appreciated a chat about the Working Time Regulations however).

Short answer - Humph can legitimately have his fence (might have made it of square section wooden beams stuck to the outside of the steps though- in putlocks). :)
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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby An Absent Humphrey » Sat Aug 27, 2016 7:09 pm

I'm pretty sure they were actually called 'putlogs', not '...locks'. Because that was where they...er...put the logs.
Anyway.

Right. Work on the battlements is now complete!

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This means that work on the tower is now done. Construction now starts on the wooden stairs plus some courtyard clutter. And then on to painting.
What I have done is give it all a once over in a flat colour to pull it all together and see if there are any areas that need attention. There are one or two spots, but I'm essentially happy with it.

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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby Bronshtein » Sat Aug 27, 2016 7:31 pm

Putlock/Putlog - Oxford English has both as alternatives, both late 17th century - no evidence as to which was first or that the word refers to 'logs' however attractive that may appear.

Like the battlements. :D
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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby An Absent Humphrey » Mon Aug 29, 2016 12:49 pm

Done!

Here’s an overview picture

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And here’s some ‘mood’ shots.
It is unknown when the castle was actually built. It is not recorded in the Domesday Book but is mentioned in the Gesta Stephani as ‘a stone tower with stockade’. It is thought it was built sometime in the 1120s/30s.
Here it is pictured in 1138. The local lord (who sided with the King) is having some kind of altercation with the parish priest.

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Here we see the castle again, some 130 years later. Nothing changes. Those barrels still need to be moved inside the castle, and the Lord of the manor is still having disagreements with the priest (who seems to have received a bit of a promotion).

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In the following picture there is something of note to architectural historians. You will notice the east wall (to the left in this picture) is constructed from a different course of stone. During the reign of King John the castle had been besieged and siege engines brought to bear upon it. The upper floor of the east wall was reduced to rubble. The lower floor had been substantially weakened and had to be dismantled before being rebuilt, but in a different render.

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Shortly after the scenes depicted above the castle fell into ruin. The owner had backed the rebels led by De Montfort and for this, and due to the fact that there was no heir, the castle became Crown property. Within just two generations the tower had been taken down to use in local building projects. To this day one can still find examples of the tower’s stone mouldings and tracery in the parish church and an associated tithe barn, but nothing remains of the tower itself.

Image

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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby Duff » Mon Aug 29, 2016 12:57 pm

Cock on Humph. :froth: :froth: :froth: :froth:
broney wrote:You weren't there man! How many stiles are there on the Offa's Dyke Walk? You don't know Man!


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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby Patrice » Mon Aug 29, 2016 1:09 pm

Superb!

Can't wait to see it besieged later also, in the WOTR, and in the ECW too! 8)
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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby The Dozing Dragon » Mon Aug 29, 2016 1:53 pm

Brilliant. Now build more.
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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby Bronshtein » Mon Aug 29, 2016 2:15 pm

Pevsner notes however, in his Buildings of England Series, re the East wall of the Tower, that there are two distinct hands at work here. On the interior facings of the battlements atop the east wall there has been an attempt at some stage to match the original stonework.

In an unpublished addendum to the series, Pevsner reveals in a letter to his publisher, that he was unable to confirm further the interior continuation of that theme, as he had, upon mentioning the matter to the then owner Lord Humphrey of Sandwich, been horse whipped from the premises by his Lordship and told to 'Jolly well mind your own business you frightful Hun!'

Pevsner did not feel it necessary to determine further the cause of this irregularity in the stonework.
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Re: Norman Stone Keep

Postby Bronshtein » Mon Aug 29, 2016 2:18 pm

Oh yes - a lovely piece of work Humph!
Very jealous. :froth:
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